Advertisement

Supporting Parent Use of Evidence-Based Practices for Infants and Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Suzanne Kucharczyk
  • Samuel L. Odom
  • Ann W. Cox
  • Evelyn Shaw
  • Ann M. Sam
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

As reliable diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) becomes possible for children at younger and younger ages, the need increases for early intervention systems and providers to be well acquainted with effective implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). Implementing EBPs in natural settings, such as homes and communities, requires that knowledge and use of EBPs is accessible to parents and caregivers. This chapter describes a model, the ASD Toddler Initiative model, which through funding from Autism Speaks supports early intervention programs and providers in building and sustaining quality programs for coaching of parents on the selection, implementation, and monitoring of EBPs with their infants and toddlers. Grounded in implementation science, facilitators and challenges to implementing the ASD Toddler Initiative model are described at the system (i.e., state, agency) and personal (i.e., family, practitioner) levels. An integration of these implementation drivers with the model processes and professional development supports prepares early intervention systems and practitioners to meet the developing needs of families and their young children with ASD.

Keywords

Parent-implemented interventions Professional development model Implementation science Evidence-based practices Autism spectrum disorder 

References

  1. AFIRM Team. (2015). Autism Focused Intervention Resources and Modules Website. Chapel Hill, NC: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder, FPG Child Development Center, University of North Carolina. Retrieved from http://afirm.fpg.unc.edu
  2. Autism Toddler Initiative (2013). Autism toddler initiative website. http://asdtoddler.fpg.unc.edu. Accessed 1 Feb 2017.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). Child development. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/index.html. Accessed 15 June 2016.
  4. Chawarska, K., Macari, S., Volkmar, F. R., Kim, S. H., & Shic, F. (2014). ASD in infants and toddlers. In F. Volkmar, S. Rogers, R. Paul, & K. Pelphrey (Eds.), Handbook of autism and pervasive developmental disorders (Vol. 1, 4th ed., pp. 121–147). Hobokin, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  5. Cook, B., & Odom, S. L. (2013). Evidence-based practices and implementation science in special education. Exceptional Children, 79, 135–145. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440291307900201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cox, A. W., Brock, M. E., Odom, S. L., Rogers, S. J., Sullivan, L. H., Tuchman-Ginsberg, L., … Collet-Klingenberg, L. (2013). National Professional Development Center on ASD: An emerging national educational strategy. In P. Doehring (Ed.), Autism services across America: Road maps for improving state and national education, research, and training programs. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.Google Scholar
  7. Cox, A., Kucharczyk, S., Shaw, E., & Odom, S. L. (2013). ASD Toddler Initiative Learning Modules Website. Chapel Hill, NC: ASD Toddler Initiative, FPG Child Development Center, University of North Carolina. Retrieved from http://asdtoddler.fpg.unc.edu/
  8. Dawson, G., Rogers, S., Munson, J., Smith, M., Winter, J., Greenson, J., … Varley, J. (2010). Randomized, controlled trial of an intervention for toddlers with autism: The Early Start Denver Model. Pediatrics, 125, 17–23. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0958CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Estes, A., Vismara, L., Mercado, C., Fitzpartrick, A., Elder, L., Greenson, J., … Rogers, S. J. (2014). The impact of parent-delivered intervention on parents of very young children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 353–365. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-013-1874-zCrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Fixsen, D. L., Blase, K. A., Metz, A., & Van Dyke, M. (2013). Statewide implementation of evidence-based programs. Exceptional Children, 79, 213–232. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440291307900206CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Fixsen, D. L., Naoom, S. F., Blase, K. A., Friedman, R. M., & Wallace, F. (2005). Implementation research: A synthesis of the literature. Chapel Hill, NC: National Implementation Research Network http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/PDF/nirnmonograph.pdf. Accessed 1 Feb 2017.Google Scholar
  12. Franzone, E., Kucharczyk, S., Sullivan, L., & Szidon, K. (2012). Facilitating the use of evidence-based practices in classrooms: The National Professional Development Center Model. In P. Mundy & A. Mastergeorge (Eds.), Autism for educators (pp. 131–153). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  13. Hume, K., Wong, C., Plavnick, J., & Schultz, T. (2014). Use of visual supports with young children with autism spectrum disorders. In J. Tarbox, D. R. Dixon, P. Sturmey, & J. L. Matson (Eds.), Handbook of early intervention for autism spectrum disorders (pp. 375–402). New York: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0401-3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. IDEA Infant & Toddler Coordinators Association (2014). ITCA tipping points survey Part C implementation: State challenges and responses. http://www.ideainfanttoddler.org/pdf/2014-ITCA-State-Challenges-Report.pdf. Retrieved 1 Feb 2017.
  15. Johnson, C. P., Myers, S. M., & the Council on Children with Disabilities. (2007). Identification and evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics, 120, 1183–1215. doi:https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.
  16. Jones, W., & Klin, A. (2013). Attention to eyes is present but in decline in 206 month-old infants later diagnosed with autism. Nature, 504, 427–428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kasari, C., Gulsrud, A., Paprella, T., Helleman, G., & Berry, K. (2015). Randomized comparative efficacy study of parent-mediated interventions for toddlers with autism. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83, 554–563. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0039080CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  18. Koegel, L. K., Koegel, R. L., Ashbaugh, K., & Bradshaw, J. (2014). The importance of early identification and intervention for children with or at risk for autism spectrum disorders. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 16, 50–56. https://doi.org/10.3109/17549507.2013.861511CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Kucharczyk, S., Shaw, E., Smith Myles, B., Sullivan, L., Szidon, K., & Tuchman-Ginsberg, L. (2012). Guidance & coaching on evidence-based practices for learners with autism spectrum disorders. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/NPDC_CoachingManual.pdf. Retrieved 1 Feb 2017Google Scholar
  20. Lovaas, O. I., Koegel, R., Simons, J. Q., & Long, J. S. (1973). Some generalization and follow-up measure on autistic children in behavior therapy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 6, 131–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Meyers, D. C., Durlak, J. A., & Wandersman, A. (2012). The quality implementation framework: A synthesis of critical steps in the implementation process. American Journal of Community Psychology, 50, 462–480. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-012-9522-xCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. National Research Council. (2001). Educating children with autism. Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  23. Odom, S. L., Boyd, B., Hall, L., & Hume, K. (2014). Comprehensive treatment models for children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. In F. Volkmar, S. Rogers, K. Pelphrey, & R. Paul (Eds.), Handbook of autism and pervasive developmental disorders (Vol. 2, pp. 770–778). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  24. Odom, S. L., Collet-Klingenberg, L., Rogers, S., & Hatton, D. (2010). Evidence-based practices for children and youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Preventing School Failure, 54, 275–282. https://doi.org/10.1080/10459881003785506CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Odom, S. L., Cox, A., & Brock, M. (2013). Implementation science, professional development, and Autism Spectrum Disorders: National Professional Development Center on ASD. Exceptional Children, 79(3), 233–251. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440291307900207CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Odom, S. L., Hume, K., Boyd, B., & Stabel, A. (2012). Moving beyond the intensive behavior therapy vs. eclectic dichotomy: Evidence-based and individualized program for students with autism. Behavior Modification, 36(3), 270–297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Odom, S. L., Rogers, S., McDougle, C. J., Hume, K., & McGee, G. (2007). Early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder. In S. Odom, R. Horner, M. Snell, & J. Blacher (Eds.), Handbook of developmental disabilities (pp. 199–223). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  28. Ozonoff, S., Iosif, A., Young, G. S., Hepburn, S., Thompson, M., Colombi, C., … Rogers, S. J. (2011). Onset patterns in autism: Correspondence between home video and parent report. Journal of the Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 50, 796–806. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2011.03.012CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ozonoff, S., Young, G. S., Landa, R. J., Brian, J., Bryson, S., Charman, T., … Iosif, A. (2015). Diagnostic stability in young children at risk for autism spectrum disorder: A baby siblings research consortium. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 56, 988–998. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12421CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. Pring, R., & Thomas, G. (2004). Evidence-based practice in education. New York: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Rogers, S. J., Estes, A., Lord, C., Vismara, L., Winter, J., Fitzpatrick, A., … Dawson, G. (2012). Effects of a brief Early Start Denver Model (ESDM)—based parent intervention on toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders. Journal of the Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 1052–1065.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Ruble, L. A., McGrew, J. H., & Toland, M. D. (2012). Goal attainment scaling as an outcome measure in randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 42, 1974–1983. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-012-1446-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Schertz, H. H., Odom, S. L., Baggett, K. M., & Sideris, J. H. (2013). Effects of joint attention mediated learning for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: An initial randomized controlled study. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28, 249–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Schopler, E., & Reichler, R. J. (1971). Parents as cotherapists in the treatment of psychotic children. Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia, 1, 87–102. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01537746CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Schreibman, L., Dawson, G., Stahmer, A. C., Landa, R., Rogers, S. J., McGee, G. G., … Halladay, A. (2015). Naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions: Empirically validated treatments for autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45, 2411–2428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Siller, M., Hutman, T., & Sigman, M. (2013). A parent-mediated intervention to increase responsive parental behaviors and child communication in children with ASD: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 540–555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Siller, M., Morgan, L., Turner-Brown, L., Baggett, K. M., Baranek, G. T., Brian, J., … Zwaigenbaum, L. (2014). Designing studies to evaluate parent-mediated interventions for toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Early Intervention, 35(4), 355–377. https://doi.org/10.1177/1053815114542507CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Snyder, P., Hemmeter, M. L., Meeker, K. A., Kinder, K., Pasia, C., & McLaughlin, T. (2012). Characterizing key features of the early childhood professional development literature. Infants & Young Children, 25(3), 188–212. https://doi.org/10.1097/IYC.0b013e31825a1ebfCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K., Cox, A. W., Fettig, A., Kucharczyk, S., … Schultz, T. R. (2014). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, Autism Evidence-Based Practice Review Group http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/node/21. Retrieved 1 Feb 2017.Google Scholar
  40. Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K. A., Cox, A. W., Fettig, A., Kucharczyk, S., … Schultz, T. R. (2015). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with autism spectrum disorders: A comprehensive review. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 49, 1951–1966. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-014-2351-zCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Workgroup on Principles and Practices in Natural Environments, OSEP TA Community of Practice: Part C Settings. (2008, March). Agreed upon mission and key principles for providing early intervention services in natural environments. http://ectacenter.org/~pdfs/topics/families/Finalmissionandprinciples3_11_08.pdf. Retrieved 1 Feb 2017.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne Kucharczyk
    • 1
  • Samuel L. Odom
    • 2
  • Ann W. Cox
    • 2
  • Evelyn Shaw
    • 2
  • Ann M. Sam
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations