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Continental Perspectives

  • Alistair Ross
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Politics of Identity and Citizenship Series book series ( CAL)

Abstract

Narratives of identities can be constructed in relation to country and European region. This chapters groups 29 countries into regions that hold similarities in terms of history, culture and ethos, and considers two perspectives: how the inhabitants broadly construct themselves as a distinct group, or not, within Europe; and how other Europeans, in other countries or regions characterise the region. The eight regional groups examined are: the Nordic/Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden); the Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania); the Visegrád Group (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia); the Balkan area (Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Romania, Slovenia); the south-eastern states of Cyprus (including North Cyprus); Turkey; the southern states (Italy, Portugal, Spain); the central-western states (Belgium, France, Netherlands, Switzerland); and the mitteleuropa states (Austria, Germany, Luxembourg).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alistair Ross
    • 1
  1. 1.London Metropolitan UniversityLondonUK

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