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Land: Landscape

  • Sonja Boon
  • Lesley Butler
  • Daze Jefferies
Chapter

Abstract

Framed around family vacations with a geographer parent, this essay considers the meanings of landscapes. Scientific understandings suggest that land is measurable; sensuous geographies, however, offer a different way in. Drawing on the work of Katherine McKittrick, bell hooks, and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, as well as childhood engagements with the micro-geographies of plant life in Newfoundland, this chapter asserts a need to work closely and intimately with the land, tuning in to the multiplicity of our senses to help reveal the landscape as an assemblage of smaller things continually and complexly interconnected.

Keywords

Landscape Poetics Pedagogy Assemblage 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonja Boon
    • 1
  • Lesley Butler
    • 1
  • Daze Jefferies
    • 1
  1. 1.Memorial University of NewfoundlandSt John’sCanada

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