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Erosion: Fugitivity

  • Sonja Boon
  • Lesley Butler
  • Daze Jefferies
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter builds links between the geographic phenomenon of erosion and Black and Indigenous engagements with fugitivity. In particular, it interrogates the possibilities of a fugitive geography, considering the idea of erosion not as destructive, but rather as revelatory. Noisy, exuberant, and excessive, a fugitive geography challenges notions of land and bodies controllable, countable, and containable. This chapter suggests that a fugitive approach to geography, as an opening to chaos, is an invitation to new ways of seeing.

Keywords

Geography Erosion Fugitivity Marronage 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonja Boon
    • 1
  • Lesley Butler
    • 1
  • Daze Jefferies
    • 1
  1. 1.Memorial University of NewfoundlandSt John’sCanada

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