Advertisement

Governing the Consumption of Antimicrobials: The Danish Model for Using Antimicrobials in a Comparative Perspective

  • Carsten Strøby Jensen
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents different national government structures and regulative frameworks, as well as the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) international initiatives towards current and future risks of human health related to antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and analyzes how those structures and frameworks influence the use of antibiotics in different countries. This chapter zooms in on Denmark as an interesting case for two reasons: relatively strong regulations and governance both in the human and the veterinarian sectors and a relatively low use of antibiotics both on humans and animals.

References

  1. Aarestrup, F. M. (1999). Association between the consumption of antimicrobial agents in animal husbandry and the occurrence of resistant bacteria among food animals. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 12, 279–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Aulakh, P. S., & Gencturk, E. F. (2000). International principal–agent relationships: Control, governance and performance. Industrial Marketing Management, 29, 521–538.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. DANMAP. (2016). DANMAP (2015)—Use of antimicrobial agents and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from food animals, food and humans in Denmark. Retrieved from http://www.danmap.org/Downloads/Reports.aspx
  4. Elgie, R. (2002). The politics of the European Central Bank: Principal-agent theory and the democratic deficit. Journal of European Public Policy, 9, 186–200. https://doi.org/10.1080/13501760110120219CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. (2015). Antimicrobial resistance surveillance in Europe 2014. Annual Report of the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net), Stockholm.Google Scholar
  6. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, European Food Safety Authority, European Medicines Agency. (2015). ECDC/EFSA/EMA first joint report on the integrated analysis of the consumption of antimicrobial agents and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from humans and food-producing animals: Joint Interagency Antimicrobial Consumption and Resistance Analysis (JIACRA). Report of EFSA Journal, 13, 4006. https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. European Commission. (2015). ECDC/EFSA/EMA first joint report on the integrated analysis of the consumption of antimicrobial agents and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from humans and food-producing animals. European Food Safety Authority.Google Scholar
  8. European Medicines Agency. (2014). Sales of veterinary antimicrobial agents in 26 EU/EEA countries in 2012. Fourth ESVAC report, London.Google Scholar
  9. Eurostat. (2014). Pig farming in the European Union: Considerable variations from one Member State to another. Statistics in Focus 15/2014.Google Scholar
  10. Gelband, H., Miller-Petrie, M., Pant, S., Gandra, S., Levinson, J., White, A., & Laxminarayan, R. (2015). The state of the world’s antibiotics 2015. Washington, DC: The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy.Google Scholar
  11. OECD. (2015). Health at a glance 2015: OECD indicator. Paris: OECD Publishing.Google Scholar
  12. Stivers, T. (2007). Prescribing under pressure: Parent-physician conversations and antibiotics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Weber, M. (1968). Economy and society: An outline of interpretive sociology. New York: Bedminster Press.Google Scholar
  14. WHO. (2017). Critically important antimicrobials for human medicine, 5th revision. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

Personalised recommendations