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Residential Treatment of Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders: Evidence-Based Approaches and Best Practice Recommendations

  • Emily K. LichvarEmail author
  • Sally Stilwell
  • Tanvi Ajmera
  • Andrea L. Alexander
  • Robert W. Plant
  • Peter Panzarella
  • Gary M. Blau
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Children's and Families' Lives book series (IICL)

Abstract

The rate of alcohol and drug abuse among adolescents and the number of youth at risk for the development of substance use disorders later in life remain a serious, national health concern. Deeper end services, such as residential treatment, may be indicated for youth with severe substance use disorder. Residential substance abuse treatment for adolescents has continued to lack adequate research regarding its practices and outcomes. However, separately, there are best practices, principles and strategies in both residential treatment and in adolescent substance abuse treatment. In this chapter both are summarized to outline the best possible care for adolescents with substance use disorder. Also explored are the prevalence rates of commonly used substances among adolescents (e.g., alcohol, marijuana), population parameters, theoretical background of principle interventions, interventions that work, interventions that might work, interventions that do not work, policy changes pertaining to health care, and treatment recommendations.

Keywords

Residential treatment Adolescents Substance use disorders Evidence-based practices Adolescent substance use 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily K. Lichvar
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sally Stilwell
    • 2
  • Tanvi Ajmera
    • 1
  • Andrea L. Alexander
    • 1
  • Robert W. Plant
    • 3
  • Peter Panzarella
    • 4
  • Gary M. Blau
    • 5
  1. 1.Child, Adolescent & Family Branch, Center for Mental Health ServicesSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.JacksonvilleUSA
  3. 3.MiddlefieldUSA
  4. 4.North FranklinUSA
  5. 5.SAMHSAUSA

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