Advertisement

Urban Water Management Under Uncertainty: A System Dynamic Approach

  • Nguyen Hieu TrungEmail author
  • Nguyen Hong Duc
  • Nguyen Thanh Loc
  • Dinh Diep Anh Tuan
  • Lam Van Thinh
  • Kim Lavane
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Global Change Research book series (AGLO, volume 64)

Abstract

Urban water management (UWM) is a complex task with a number of constraints especially in developing cities. Rapid population growth, inadequate water infrastructure, and inefficiency in water management policies have led to increased pressure on the city’s water supply and drainage systems. These challenges, however, remain uncertain in terms of both temporal scale and magnitude of change, such as climate change and sea level rise. A city needs an appropriate framework to support not only short-term adaptation activities but also long-term strategies to enhance its resilience to these uncertainties. Therefore, system dynamics—methodologies to frame, understand, and discuss complex issues and problems—is a suitable approach for such complex UWM issues. The purpose of this chapter is to share our experiences in applying a system dynamics approach in Can Tho City, Vietnam. The study went through several steps that involved identifying key stakeholders and tools to support decision making, recognizing exogenous uncertainties and potential measures with their effectiveness indicators, building models to support decision making in present and future scenarios related to the UWM, and engaging stakeholders during the study approach to ensure the complex model results were well taken up and used for their future decisions. Throughout the case study, the system dynamics approach shows its capacity in supporting the city’s policy makers and managers in dealing with such interdisciplinary and complex issues.

Keywords

Urban water management System dynamic Robust decision support Stakeholder engagement Flood Water pollution Scenario analysis Climate change Sea level rise 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by the Sustainable Mekong Research Network (SUMERNET)—Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) Asia. We would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Eric Kemp-Benedict, Dr. Chayanis Krittasudthacheewa, Dr. Chu Thai Hoanh, Ms. Ha Nguyen, and Mr. Agus Nugroho from SEI for providing us with great technical and logistic support during the study implementation. We thank our colleagues from the Can Tho City Climate Change Coordination Office, especially Mr. Ky Quang Vinh and Ms. Chau Thi Kim Thoa, for their great assistance in data collection and their close collaboration in ensuring stakeholder engagement during the study implementation. We also would like to thank the staff from the city’s departments and offices, researchers from Can Tho University, and local research institutes for their informative discussions in the consultation workshops. Last but not least, we acknowledge the interviewees in Ninh Kieu District for the valuable information they provided during the household survey.

References

  1. CSIRO. (2012). Planning for sustainable urban water systems in adapting to a changing climate – a case study in Can Tho City, Vietnam. In: M. Nguyen et al. (Eds.), CSIRO.Google Scholar
  2. Erban, L. E., Gorelick, S. M., & Zebker, H. A. (2014). Groundwater extraction, land subsidence, and sea-level rise in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Environmental Research Letters, 9(8), 84010 Available at: http://stacks.iop.org/1748-9326/9/i=8/a=084010?key=crossref.b639ea338e342899358515e74a86f960.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Huong, H. T. L., & Pathirana, A. (2013). Urbanization and climate change impacts on future urban flooding in Can Tho city, Vietnam. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17(1), 379–394.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Mitchell, R. K., Agle, B. R., & Wood, D. J. (1997). Toward a theory of stakeholder identification and salience: Defining the principle of who and what really counts. The Academy of Management Review, 22(4), 853. Available at: http://www.jstor.org/stable/259247?origin=crossref. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Moglia, M. et al. (2012). Application of the water needs index: Can Tho City, Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Journal of Hydrology, 468–469, 203–212. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169412007159. Accessed 8 Oct 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Neumann, L. E., et al. (2013). Water use, sanitation and health in a fragmented urban water system: Case study and household survey. Urban Water Journal, 11(3), 1–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Prime Minister. (2013). Quyết định 1533/QĐ-TTg năm 2013 quy hoạch tổng thể phát triển kinh tế xã hội Cần Thơ 2020. Available at: https://thuvienphapluat.vn/van-ban/Thuong-mai/Quyet-dinh-1533-QD-TTg-nam-2013-quy-hoach-tong-the-phat-trien-kinh-te-xa-hoi-Can-Tho-2020-205926.aspx. Accessed 2 Sept 2017.
  8. Ramalho, E. C. (2017). Pore water pressures and slope stability impacts of 25 years of groundwater extraction on subsidence in the Mekong delta, Vietnam. Environmental Research Letters, 9. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/9/8/084010/meta
  9. Rossman, L. A. (2015). Storm water management model user’s manual, Available at: http://www.epa.gov/water-research/storm-water-management-model-swmm
  10. Van, P. D. T. et al. (2012). A study of the climate change impacts on fluvial flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(12), 4637–4649. Available at: http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/4637/2012/. Accessed June 13, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. World Bank. (2014). Can Tho, Vietnam: Enhancing urban resilience. Washington, DC: Work Bank Group.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nguyen Hieu Trung
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Nguyen Hong Duc
    • 1
  • Nguyen Thanh Loc
    • 1
  • Dinh Diep Anh Tuan
    • 2
  • Lam Van Thinh
    • 1
  • Kim Lavane
    • 1
  1. 1.College of the Environment and Natural ResourcesCan Tho UniversityCan ThoVietnam
  2. 2.Research Institute for Climate ChangeCan Tho UniversityCan ThoVietnam

Personalised recommendations