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Afterword: What Next for Romanian Transnational Family Research?

  • Viorela Ducu
Chapter

Abstract

After a short review of research on Romanian transnational families, in this short chapter, we provide a summary of previous chapters. This is followed by a projection of the future of transnational family research with regard to families including Romanian members.

Keywords

Romanian transnational families Research 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Viorela Ducu
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Population StudiesBabeș-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania

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