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Superdiversity in Music Education

  • Brent C. TalbotEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education book series (LAAE, volume 23)

Abstract

Globalization has changed the social, cultural, and linguistic diversity in societies all over the world (Blommaert, J & Rampton, B. Diversities, 13(2), 1–22 (2011)). As new technologies have rapidly developed alongside increased forms of transnational flow, so have new forms of language, art, music, communication, and expression. This rapid and varied blending of cultures, ideas, and modes of communication is what Vertovec (2007) describes as super-diversity—diversity within diversity. In this narrative, I explore the theoretical and methodological pluralism that has aided my research in diverse settings, drawing from post-structuralism, critical theory, sociolinguistics, complexity theory, and discourse analysis—specifically Scollon and Scollon’s (Scollon, R & Scollon, W S. Discourses in place: Language in the material world. London: Routledge (2003), 10.4324/9780203422724; Scollon, R & Scollon, W S. Nexus analysis: Discourse and the emerging internet. New York: Routledge (2004)) recommendations for nexus analysis and Blommaert’s theoretical principles and concepts of ethnography, globalization, and superdiversity (Blommaert, J. Discourse. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2005), 10.1017/CBo9780511610295; Blommaert, J. The sociolinguistics of globalization. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2010), 10.1017/CBO9780511845307; Blommaert, J. Ethnography, superdiversity and linguistic landscapes: Chronicles of complexity. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters (2013)). I promote a need to develop a robust toolkit for music education that (1) better analyzes how we position and are positioned as part of larger groups and practices operating within multiple layers of social, cultural, and historical context, and (2) better advocates for equitable practices and inclusive spaces in our field.

Keywords

Discourse Superdiversity Globalization Ethnography Semiotics Nexus analysis Music education 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Music EducationThe Sunderman Conservatory of Music at Gettysburg CollegeGettysburgUSA

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