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Extraction

  • Romeo T. Toledo
  • Rakesh K. Singh
  • Fanbin Kong
Chapter
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

One area in food processing that is receiving increasing attention is extraction. This separation process involves two phases. The solvent is the material added to form a phase different from that where the material to be separated originally was present. Separation is achieved when the compound to be separated dissolves in the solvent, while the rest of the components remain where they were originally. The two phases may be solid and liquid, immiscible liquid phases, or solid and gas. Solid-liquid extraction is also called leaching. In supercritical fluid extraction, gas at supercritical conditions contacts a solid or a liquid solution containing the solute. Extraction has been practiced in the vegetable oil industry for a long time. Oil from soybean, corn, and rice bran cannot be separated by mechanical pressing; therefore, solvent extraction is used for their recovery. In the production of olive oil, the product from the first pressing operation is the extra-virgin olive oil, the residue after first press may be repressed to obtain the virgin olive oil, and further recovery of oil from the cake is done by solvent extraction. Oil from peanuts is recovered by mechanical pressing and extraction of the pressed cake to completely remove the oil. One characteristic of solvent extracted oilseed meal is the high quality of the residual protein, suitable for further processing into food-grade powders. They may also be texturized for use as food protein extenders.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Romeo T. Toledo
    • 1
  • Rakesh K. Singh
    • 1
  • Fanbin Kong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science & TechnologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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