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Hepatitis C and Pregnancy

  • Rebecca A. M. Pierce-Williams
  • Jeanne S. Sheffield
Chapter

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the leading causes of liver disease, affecting 130–150 million people worldwide (World Health Organization. Media Centre. Hepatitis C. Fact Sheet, 2016). The virus causes chronic liver disease in 70–85% of persons infected with HCV with associated sequelae such as cirrhosis, liver cancer, and death. While the most common cause of transmission is injection drug use with shared needles, HCV can be transmitted from an infected mother to her fetus. Close follow-up is critical for the HCV-exposed infant, as approximately 5% of exposed infants will become infected. The focus of this chapter is to review hepatitis C in pregnancy and its implications for the neonate.

Keywords

Hepatitis C Infant Injection drug use Polymerase chain reaction 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca A. M. Pierce-Williams
    • 1
  • Jeanne S. Sheffield
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySinai Hospital of BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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