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Unstable Literature

  • Sébastien Doubinsky
Chapter

Abstract

This essay questions literature as a stable concept, in order to open new possibilities based on its ontological variability. In a world where frames are moving in every direction and thwart attempts to develop normative elements which are often nothing more than a disguised scale of values, Doubinsky advocates a relative position of the critical reader, as well as a redefinition of “works” based on their object nature. He thus intends to go beyond the traditional divisions between “literature” and “World Literature”, by re-framing the fields (in a Bourdieusian way) in which works are studied, through the perspective of a “relative” reader using his/her relativity as a basis of his/her reading.

Keywords

Literature Critical reading Interpretation Pierre Bourdieu Roland Barthes Literariness Textuality Literary canon Role of readers 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sébastien Doubinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Aarhus UniversityAarhusDenmark

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