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Prime Ministerial Resources

  • Birgit Bujard
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Political Science book series (CPS)

Abstract

This chapter outlines the British prime minister’s institutional and individual resources. As explained in Chap.  2, he has resources at his disposal to influence decision-making in the core executive. These can broadly be divided into institutional and individual resources. Such a classification is helpful to analyse an actor’s political leadership and is used here. But as mentioned in Sect.  2.2.3, a look at political science literature shows that the classification of resources into these categories varies (e.g. Bennister, The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 9(3), 327–345, 2007; Heffernan, British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 5(3), 347–372, 2003; Smith, The Core Executive in Britain, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999). Thus it has to be taken into account that this division is not always as clear-cut as one might hope.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birgit Bujard
    • 1
  1. 1.CologneGermany

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