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Al-Qaeda: A Model for “Sustainable Disorder”?

  • Derviş Fikret Ünal
  • Murat Demirel
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Complexity book series (SPCOM)

Abstract

The demise of the socialist camp was regarded as an end to ideological conflicts, and many claimed that there was an absolute liberal triumph over others, which implied “the end of history” indeed. However, developments following the end of the Cold War have consistently proved that not all actors of the international politics have shared liberal values. Instead, fundamentalist movements and radical organizations are increasingly becoming a serious concern today. Al-Qaeda, which offers a Salafist way of thinking, plays an important role in this respect. The article argues that al-Qaeda presents a model for other radical terrorist organizations such as DEASH, which are posing a threat to several countries causing disorder and may trigger more chaotic security environment in the future.

Keywords

Al-Qaeda Osama Bin Laden The United States September 11 Taliban Afghanistan Disorder and chaos 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derviş Fikret Ünal
    • 1
  • Murat Demirel
    • 2
  1. 1.Turkish Ministry of Foreign AffairsAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Nevşehir Hacı Bektaş Veli UniversityNevşehirTurkey

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