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Cheese: An Overview

  • Marco Gobbetti
  • Erasmo Neviani
  • Patrick Fox
Chapter

Abstract

Cheese is the most diverse group of dairy products and is, arguably, the most academically interesting and challenging. While most dairy products, if properly manufactured and stored, are biologically, biochemically, chemically, and physically very stable, cheeses are biologically and biochemically dynamic, and are inherently unstable. Throughout manufacture and ripening, cheese production represents a finely orchestrated series of consecutive and concomitant biochemical events, which, if synchronized and balanced, lead to products with highly desirable aromas and flavors but when unbalanced, result in off-flavors and odors.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Gobbetti
    • 1
  • Erasmo Neviani
    • 2
  • Patrick Fox
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Science and TechnologyFree University of BolzanoBolzanoItaly
  2. 2.Food and Drug DepartmentUniversity of ParmaParmaItaly
  3. 3.School of Food and Nutritional SciencesUniversity CollegeCorkIreland

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