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Shakespeare Beyond the Trenches: The German Myth of unser Shakespeare in Transnational Perspective

  • Benedict Schofield
Chapter
Part of the Reproducing Shakespeare book series (RESH)

Abstract

Schofield’s chapter assesses the legacy of the German myth of unser Shakespeare (our Shakespeare) in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It explores the development of the myth of Shakespeare as the German national poet, and the ways in which this idea was challenged as it entered into transnational circulation. It reveals how figures such as the dramatist Brecht, the director Thomas Ostermeier, and companies such as the Bremer Shakespeare Company have supported the dissemination of the myth of a German Shakespeare. The chapter ultimately traces how German Shakespeare evolved into a broader myth of German transgressive theatre, itself frequently conflated with the notion of a radical European performance aesthetic.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benedict Schofield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GermanKing’s College LondonLondonUK

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