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US Doctoral Study to Early Career

  • William K. CummingsEmail author
  • Olga Bain
Chapter
Part of the Knowledge Studies in Higher Education book series (KSHE)

Abstract

The US doctoral education systems are the most competitive systems in the world and attract global talents since WWII. This chapter provides an overview of the historial development of doctoral education in the US, the factors that have contributed to the strengths of the current system, demographic trends, as well as changes in the fields of study. However, US doctoral education is also challenged by many factors including reduced funding for doctoral students and political barriers for international students.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.George Washington UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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