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Manufactured Seeds of Woody Plants

  • Jeffrey E. Hartle
Chapter
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 84)

Abstract

Redenbaugh (Analogs of botanic seed, US Patent 4, pp. 562–663, 1986, Synseeds: application of synthetic seeds to crop improvement, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1993) defined a synthetic seed as a somatic embryo inside a coating, and as being directly analogous to a zygotic seed. There have been several names given such “seed” including artificial seed, synthetic seed, seed analog and somatic embryo seed. We believe that the term “manufactured” seed, reflects the nature of the construct in a more accurate way. The practical requirements of such seed are that they perform the basic functions of a botanic seed during the sowing and germination of a somatic embryo under field conditions. These basic functions include: protecting the embryo and surrounding nutritive matrix from mechanical damage, desiccation and microbial invasion; providing for an adequate supply of nutrients including carbon, gas exchange, and water to support germination; and physical properties that allow the germinating embryo to emerge normally from the seed under field conditions.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Phytelligence Inc.PortlandUSA

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