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Christianity, Imperialism and Modernity in Treaty Port Xiamen

  • David Woodbridge
Chapter
Part of the Global Diversities book series (GLODIV)

Abstract

This chapter will examine the question of Christianity’s relation to the wider Western presence in Xiamen. It will focus primarily on the early decades of the twentieth century, a period depicted in recent scholarship as a high point for the status and achievements of Protestantism in China.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to express my thanks to Chris White for his comments during the writing of this chapter, and for his sharing of relevant archival material.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Woodbridge
    • 1
  1. 1.The National ArchivesRichmondUK

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