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Staff and Teaching in Sociology at LSE, 1950–: The Short Half-Century

  • Christopher T. HusbandsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In 1950 the University of London was still the only university in the country accredited to award degrees in sociology, but the mid-century is a good point, after LSE had taught sociology for almost fifty years, to assess the Department’s position and to ask whether and, if so to what degree, what followed built in any way on what had gone before. The mid-century break to consider these issues has of course a degree of arbitrariness, but it is useful heuristically, for the 1940s saw the end of the period when Sociology was dominated by its pre-war personalities. The post-war years brought more students and, more relevant perhaps, a significant expansion in staff numbers as the discipline began to gain a wider academic foothold. However, this period also saw the subject move in theoretical directions that the pre-war regime would not always have recognized. New issues demanded new perspectives and some of those who delivered these are listed in Table W4.1, which lists all major appointments to the Department from 1950 to 2015.

Supplementary material

462218_1_En_4_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Table W4.1 Sociology teaching staff at the London School of Economics and Political Science, by decade of start year, 1950 to 2015 (DOCX 22 kb)
462218_1_En_4_MOESM2_ESM.docx (13 kb)
Table W4.2 Identified Morris Ginsberg Fellows [MG] and T. H. Marshall Postdoctoral Fellows [THM], 1974 to 2006 (DOCX 16 kb)
462218_1_En_4_MOESM3_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Table W4.3 Conveners (Heads of Department) and Departmental Tutors of the Department of Sociology of the London School of Economics and Political Science, 1963 to 2016 (DOCX 15 kb)
462218_1_En_4_MOESM4_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Table W4.4 Identified Visiting Professors to the Department of Sociology and cognate divisions of the London School of Economics and Political Science, 1998 to 2015 (DOCX 16 kb)

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Emeritus Reader in SociologyLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK

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