Advertisement

The Department’s Mid-Century Personalities and Their Role in Shaping LSE Sociology: Ginsberg, MacRae, and Glass

  • Christopher T. HusbandsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

It is perhaps an irony of fame that those whose passage through an institution was of sufficient duration that their personality was able to impose some surviving stamp on it are remembered by posterity as much for their negative effects as for any positive contributions that they may have made; on the other hand, the oblivion of history erases memories of any negative effects of lesser mortals, even at the cost also of erasing those of any positive contributions that they may have had. Some may argue against this cynical view of institutional history but what is less disputable is that certain individuals do leave a longer-term legacy, albeit that sociologists have been suspicious of what, in the days before any gender sensitivity in the use of language, was labelled ‘the Great Man theory of history’. Their alternative view is that historical trajectories are determined by far more than the contributions of particular individuals; if that were not the case, a major raison d’être of their subject would evaporate. Even so, it is incontestable that individuals in strategic positions in an institution may have some determining effect upon its current ambience and its historical development and the three individuals to whom this chapter is devoted were hugely influential, probably more so than any others, in shaping LSE Sociology; that alone justifies the status afforded to them by the chapter’s specific focus on them.

References

  1. Baker, A. P. (2004). Glass, Ruth Adele (1912–1990). Oxford dictionary of national biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Britten, N. (1981). Models of intergenerational class mobility: Findings from the National Survey of Health and Development. British Journal of Sociology, 32(2), 224–238.Google Scholar
  3. Caine, Sir S. (1974). Ginsberg at the L.S.E. In R. Fletcher (Ed.), The science of society and the unity of mankind (pp. 29–32). London: Heinemann Educational Books.Google Scholar
  4. Edgar, L. I. (1971). Memorial address for Morris Ginsberg. Jewish Journal of Sociology, 13(1), 15–16.Google Scholar
  5. Fletcher, R. (1974). Introduction. In R. Fletcher (Ed.), The science of society and the unity of mankind (pp. 1–26). London: Heinemann Educational Books.Google Scholar
  6. Gellner, E. A. (1961). The rôle and organisation of a Berber zawiya. Unpublished PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.Google Scholar
  7. Glass, D. V. (1936). The struggle for population. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  8. Glass, D. V. (1940). Population: policies and movements in Europe. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  9. Glass, D. V. (Ed.). (1954). Social mobility in Britain. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  10. Glass, D. V. (1973). Numbering the people: the eighteenth-century population controversy and the development of census and vital statistics in Britain. Farnborough: Saxon House.Google Scholar
  11. Glass, D. V., & Blacker C. P. (1939). Population and fertility. London: Population Investigation Committee.Google Scholar
  12. Glass, D. V., & Taylor, P. A. M. (1976). Population and emigration. Dublin: Irish University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Glass, R. (1977). Verbal pollution (a review of M. Castells’ The urban question and M. Harloe (Ed.)’s Captive cities). New Society, 29 September, 41(782), 667–669.Google Scholar
  14. Gould, J. (1974). On Morris Ginsberg. Jewish Journal of Sociology, 16(1), 123–131.Google Scholar
  15. Gould, J. (1997). Obituary of Donald Gunn MacRae. The Guardian, 29 December.Google Scholar
  16. Grebenik, E. (1979). David Victor Glass (1911–1978). Population Studies, 33(1), 5–17.Google Scholar
  17. Grebenik, E. (1991). Demographic research in Britain, 1936–1986. Population Studies, Population Research in Britain Supplement, 45, 3–30.Google Scholar
  18. Grebenik, E. (2004). Glass, David Victor (1911–1978). Oxford dictionary of national biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Green, J. (2017). A political family: the Kuczynskis, fascism, espionage and the Cold War. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hall, J. A. (2010). Ernest Gellner: an intellectual biography. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  21. Halsey, A. H. (1982). Provincials and professionals: the British post-war sociologists. European Journal of Sociology, 23(1), 150–175. Reprinted in L.S.E. Quarterly, 1(1), 1987, 43–74.Google Scholar
  22. Halsey, A. H. (1994). Sociology as political arithmetic (The Glass Memorial Lecture). British Journal of Sociology, 45(3), 427–444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Halsey, A. H. (2004). Ginsberg, Morris (1889–1970). Oxford dictionary of national biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Hawthorn, G. (1970). Letter on ‘Let’s go beyond “problems”’. New Society, 15(388), 5 March, 410.Google Scholar
  25. Hobhouse, L. T., Wheeler, G. C., & Ginsberg, M. (1930 [1915]). The material culture and social institutions of the simpler peoples: an essay in correlation. London: Chapman & Hall.Google Scholar
  26. Kaspersen, L. B., & Mulvad, A. M. (2017). Towards a figurational history of Leicester Sociology, 1954–1982. Sociology, 51(6), 1186–1204.Google Scholar
  27. Langford, C. M. (1988). The Population Investigation Committee: a concise history to mark its fiftieth anniversary. London: Population Investigation Committee.Google Scholar
  28. Law, A., & Lybeck, E. R. (Eds.) (2015). Sociological amnesia: cross-currents in disciplinary history. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  29. Leat, D. (1974). Review of Donald MacRae’s Weber. Sociological Review (New Series), 22(4), 597–599.Google Scholar
  30. Lukes, S. (2004). Gellner, Ernest André (1925–1995). Oxford dictionary of national biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  31. MacRae, D. G. (1953). Social stratification: a trend report. Current Sociology, 2(1), 7–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. MacRae, D. G. (1961). Ideology and society: papers in sociology and politics. London: William Heinemann.Google Scholar
  33. MacRae, D. (1969a). In praise of literacy. New Society, 13(342), 17 April, 601.Google Scholar
  34. MacRae, D. (1969b). Populism as an ideology. In G. Ionescu & E. Gellner (Eds.), Populism: its meanings and national characteristics (pp. 153–165). London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.Google Scholar
  35. MacRae, D. (1970). Let’s go beyond ‘problems’. New Society, 15(387), 26 February, 359–360.Google Scholar
  36. MacRae, D. (1974). Weber. London: Fontana. Republished in 1985.Google Scholar
  37. Marris, P. (1970). Letter on ‘Let’s go beyond “problems”’. New Society, 15(388), 5 March, 410.Google Scholar
  38. Martin, D. (2013). The education of David Martin: the making of an unlikely sociologist. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.Google Scholar
  39. Morris, T. (1998). Obituary of Donald Gunn MacRae. The Independent, 26 January.Google Scholar
  40. Orr, J. (1976). Review of Donald MacRae’s Weber. British Journal of Sociology, 27(3), 409–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Peel, J. D. Y. (2004). MacRae, Donald Gunn (1921–1997). Oxford dictionary of national biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Emeritus Reader in SociologyLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK

Personalised recommendations