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Painful Eye

  • Natalie Sciano
Chapter

Abstract

A painful eye can be very distressing to a patient, not only due to pain but from the fear of vision loss. The painful eye carries a wide differential from self-limiting etiologies such as corneal abrasions to those that are vision threatening such as chemical and thermal burns. One must determine if the eye pain is solely ocular in origin, is a referred pain, or is due to a larger systemic process at hand. Common themes throughout the treatment of a painful eye include controlling pain, decreasing inflammation, and preventing subsequent complication such as infection and scarring which can lead to lasting visual impairments. When confronted with the painful eye, the emergency physician must have a working differential, attempt to alleviate the patient’s pain and fears, and recognize those needing further workup to improve patient outcomes.

Keywords

Painful eye Keratitis Corneal ulcer Herpes zoster ophthalmicus Corneal abrasion Glaucoma Uveitis Optic neuritis Ocular burns Episcleritis Scleritis 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalie Sciano
    • 1
  1. 1.Emergency DepartmentUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA

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