Drinking the Milk of Trust: A Performance of Authenticity

  • Cory Thomas Pechan Driver
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Anthropology of Religion book series (CAR)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on a guide to rural Jewish sites. I pay particular attention to how he uses his connection to Jews and Judaism to define himself as separate from his Arabizing community and a preserver of the Judeo-Amazigh past. The chapter opens with an extended biography of the guide’s father that serves as a personal narrative of the disintegration of Jews from Moroccan rural society. The latter half of the chapter describes how the guide grapples with a Morocco with decreasing examples of the inter-religious friendships that shaped his family.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cory Thomas Pechan Driver
    • 1
  1. 1.Council on International Educational ExchangeRabatMorocco

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