Advertisement

Sweden

  • Aage RadmannEmail author
  • Torbjörn Andersson
Chapter

Abstract

Without a doubt, football is the largest sport in Sweden, whether judged on the numbers of spectators or active players. The sport has always had intimate connections with the more general political and social developments in the country. Swedish football has been a mixture of voluntary and commercial forces and has developed hand in hand with the social democratic model of the welfare state. Sweden has been a successful football country in many ways; national teams, male- and females, have performed well in various tournaments throughout football history. Football attracts people from the whole society, both players and spectators; the supporter culture is lively and widespread but there has been, and still is, challenges when it comes to football-related violence.

Keywords

Swedish Football National Teamnational Team Swedish Sports Confederation Hammarby FIFAFédération Internationale De Football Association (FIFA) 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Andersson, T. 2001. Swedish Football Hooliganism 1900–1939. Soccer and Society 2 (1): 1–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Andersson, T. 2002. Kung fotboll. Den svenska fotbollens kulturhistoria från 1800-talets slut till 1950 [King Football. The History of Swedish Football Culture From the End of the 1800s Until 1950]. Stockholm and Stehag: Symposium.Google Scholar
  3. Andersson, T. 2005. Alcohol and the History of Swedish Football. In Sport and Substance Use in the Nordic Countries, NAD Publication 45, ed. A. Bouroncle and S. Rauhamäki, 39–60. Helsinki: Hakapaino Oy.Google Scholar
  4. Andersson, T. 2009. Assyriska och Syrianska – fotbollen som integrerande factor [Immigrant Teams in Sweden and the Case of Assyriska FF]. In Är vi inte alla minoriteter i världen? [Are We Not All Minorities in the World?], ed L. Elenius, 139–152. Stockholm: Ordfront.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Andersson, T. 2011. ‘Spela fotboll bondjävlar!’ En studie av svensk klubbkultur och lokal identitet från 1950 till 2000-talets början, del 1 [Play Football, Bloody Peasants! A Study of Swedish Club Culture and Local Identity From 1950 to the Beginning of the 2000s, Part 1]. Stockholm and Stehag: Symposion.Google Scholar
  6. Andersson, T. 2014. The 1958 World Cup in Sweden: Between Modernity and Idyll. In The FIFA World Cup 1930–2010: Politics, Commerce, Spectacle and Identities, ed. S. Rinke and K. Schiller, 142–161. Göttingen: Wallstein.Google Scholar
  7. Andersson, T. 2016. ‘Spela fotboll bondjävlar!’ En studie av svensk klubbkultur och lokal identitet från 1950 till 2000-talets början, del 2 [Play Football, Bloody Peasants! A Study of Swedish Club Culture and Local Identity From 1950 to the Beginning of the 2000s, Part 2]. Stockholm and Höör: Symposion.Google Scholar
  8. Andersson, T., J. Backman, and B. Carlsson. 2011. The Development of Swedish Men’s Club Football in the Periphery of European Football. In The Transformation of Football: A Case of Europeanisation? ed. A. Niemann, B. García, and W. Grant, 187–203. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Andersson, T., and B. Carlsson (eds.). 2009. Football in Scandinavia: A Fusion of Welfare Policy and the Market. Soccer and Society 10 (3–4): 299–304.Google Scholar
  10. Andersson, T., and A. Radmann. 1998. Från gentleman till huligan? Svensk fotbollskultur förr och nu [From Gentleman to Hooligan? Swedish Football Culture then and Now]. Stockholm: Symposion.Google Scholar
  11. Hagström, M., P. Johansson, and C. Jurell. 2010. Va för jävla pack e ni?: Berättelsen om Stockholms fotbollsklackar [What Kind of Terrible Pack Are You? The Story of Stockholm’s Football ‘Klacks’]. Stockholm: Imperial Publishing.Google Scholar
  12. Hedenborg, S., and T. Peterson. 2016. Sport and the Swedish Welfare State. In Lee, Handbook of Sport and Politics, ed. A. Bairner, J. Kelly, and J. Woo, 106–114. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Hjelm, J., and E. Olofsson. 2003. A Breakthrough. Women’s Football in Sweden. Soccer & Society 4 (2–3): 184–204.Google Scholar
  14. Lundh, O. 2016. Vad jag pratar om när jag pratar om fotboll [What I’m Talking About When I Talk About Football]. Stockholm: Albert Bonnier Förlag.Google Scholar
  15. Melkersson, M. 2013. Brand Management as a Vantage Point for Revising Developmental Opportunities and Challenges Within Contemporary Women’s Soccer in Sweden: The Case of LdB FC Malmö. Soccer & Society 14 (6): 834–849.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Norberg, J.R. 2009. Football, Football Pools and the Unexpected Arrival of Sports in Swedish Welfare Politics. Soccer and Society 10 (3–4): 418–437.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Norberg, J.R. 2011. A Brief History of the Swedish Sports Movement: From the Nineteenth Century to the Present. Revue d`histoire nordique [Nordic Historical Review] 13: 47–68.Google Scholar
  18. Radmann, A. 2012. Idrottsvåldets karaktär [The Structure of Sport Violence]. Swedish National Inquiry in Sport and Violence, SOU 23: 235–304.Google Scholar
  19. Radmann, A. 2013. Huliganlandskapet. Medier, Våld och Maskuliniteter [The Hooligan Landscape. Media, Violence and Masculinities]. Malmö: Holmbergs.Google Scholar
  20. Radmann, A. 2015. Vad är huliganism? [What is Hooliganism?]. Malmö: ARX Forlag.Google Scholar
  21. Rommel, C. 2011. Playing with Difference: Football as a Performative Space for Division Among Suryoye Migrants in Sweden. Soccer & Society 12 (6): 850–864.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Scott, C.G. 2015. African Footballers in Sweden. Race, Immigration and Integration in the Age of Globalization. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Svenska Offentliga Utredningar (SOU) Swedish Public Investigations. 1969. Report 29. Idrott åt alla. Betänkande av Idrottsutredningen [Sport for All. The Sport Inquiry Report]. Stockholm: Esselte.Google Scholar
  24. Svenska Offentliga Utredningar (SOU) Swedish Public Investigations. 2012. Report 23. Mindre våld för pengarna. Delbetänkande av nationell samordning mot brottslighet i samband med idrottsarrangemang [Less Violence for the Money. Partial Report of National Coordination Against Crime in Connection with Sporting Events]. Stockholm: Fritzes.Google Scholar
  25. Svenska Offentliga Utredningar (SOU) Swedish Public Investigations. 2013. Report 19. Mera glädje för pengarna. Delbetänkande av nationell samordning mot brottslighet i samband med idrottsarrangemang [More Enjoyment for the Money. Partial Report of National Coordination Against Crime in Connection with Sporting Events]. Stockholm: Fritzes.Google Scholar
  26. Tate, T. 2013. Girls with Balls. The Secret History of Women’s Football. London: John Blake Publishing.Google Scholar
  27. Williams, J. 2007. A Beautiful Game: International Perspectives on Women’s Football. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  28. Williams, J. 2013. Globalising Women’s Football: Europe, Migration and Professionalization. Bern: Peter Lang.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department for Physical EducationNorwegian School of Sport SciencesOsloNorway
  2. 2.Malmö UniversityMalmöSweden

Personalised recommendations