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Screening Latin America: The Sydney Latin American Film Festival

  • Fernanda PeñalozaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Abstract

This chapter explores the ways in which the Sydney Latin American Film Festival (SLAFF) contributes to the visibility of Latin American cinema in the Australian context; it focuses on the history of the Festival, on film selection and programming. Given the limited circulation of Latin American films in Australia, and the evident crowd-gathering ability of these film exhibition events, this chapter builds on the hypothesis that the range of experiences and diverse set of agendas that these cultural spaces create are essential to further our understanding of the transnational forces that traverse contemporary “Latin American cinemas.” Furthermore, Film festivals like SLAFF are fascinating cases to explore how responses/appropriations/interpretations of both cultural differences and individual and collective agency are deliberately exalted.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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