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Mavis Robertson, the Chilean New Song Tours, and the Latin American Cultural Explosion in Sydney After 1977

  • Peter RossEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Abstract

Before the overthrow of the Allende government in 1973 there was little knowledge of Latin American culture in Australia. The establishment of solidarity committees and the influx of refugees, asylum seekers, and others from Chile post-coup resulted in a diversity of activities to build awareness of what was occurring within Chile and to put pressure on the military regime. Of great importance in this work was the organization of cultural events, which included tours by prominent Chilean musicians. These attracted large audiences and led to a wider appreciation on the part of the Australian population of Latin American culture. The tours also stimulated the formation of Australian Latin American musical groups, Latin American cultural centres, and women’s groups, and the organization of solidarity events in which many ethnic performers from all over the globe participated. Central to this cultural upsurge was Mavis Robertson, a prominent member of the Communist Party of Australia, who chaired the cultural subcommittee of the Committee in Solidarity with the Chilean People in Sydney. This chapter concentrates on her role as a central figure in a growing awareness of Chile, and of Latin America, in Australia after 1973 and continues to the present.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Humanities and LanguagesUNSWSydneyAustralia

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