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The International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (Polar Code)

  • Heike Deggim
Chapter
Part of the WMU Studies in Maritime Affairs book series (WMUSTUD, volume 7)

Abstract

The International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters, better known by its short name “Polar Code”, was adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 2014/2015. The Code became effective on 1 January 2017 upon entry into force of the associated amendments making it mandatory under both the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). The Polar Code marks a historic milestone in the Organization’s work to protect ships and people aboard them, both seafarers and passengers, in the harsh and vulnerable environment of the waters surrounding the two poles, and at the same time protecting those environments. This chapter gives an overview of the requirements of the Code with regard to maritime safety and marine environment protection, also addressing its place in the existing global framework regulating international shipping. Associated training and certification requirements for officers and crew serving on ships operating in polar waters, as have been included in the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), are also described. The chapter finally examines what more can be done to ensure the safety of polar shipping, taking into account on-going discussions at IMO.

Keywords

Polar Code Regulatory framework SOLAS MARPOL Heavy fuel oil 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to acknowledge the support of my colleagues Lee Adamson and Tianbing Huang in the preparation of this chapter.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marine Environment DivisionInternational Maritime Organization (IMO)LondonUK

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