Development of System for Real-Time Collection, Sharing, and Use of Disaster Information

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

In large-scale earthquakes, it is important to quickly collect and utilize disaster information such as building collapse, street blockage, and fire outbreaks to mitigate disasters. In this paper, we develop a Web application for users to gather and share disaster information in real time. With this system, it is possible to not only share disaster information among users, but also to execute a simulation such as a fire. Next, conduct a demonstration experiment by local volunteers and investigate the usefulness and effectiveness of the system that collects disaster information. Furthermore, we analyze delay in sharing information under bandwidth-limited network environment and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system.

Keywords

Disaster information Information collection Web application Real time Demonstration experiment 

Notes

Acknowledgements

A portion of this work is supported by Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP). The author wishes to express their sincere thanks to Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Architecture and Building Engineering, School of Environment and SocietyTokyo Institute of TechnologyTokyoJapan

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