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Phenomenology of Temporality and Dimensional Psychopathology

  • Thomas Fuchs
  • Mauro Pallagrosi
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the question of temporality from a phenomenological point of view, in which the experience of lived time is regarded as a core feature of various manifestations of mental illness. The modern and widespread categorical nosology in psychiatry tends to segment a person into different behavioural criteria, whilst lacking a holistic comprehension of the person. Dimensional psychopathology offers a less anatomic vision of the patient; however, a phenomenological approach, beneficially integrated, could achieve a deeper understanding of the structural aspects of various mental disorders and maximise the efficacy of therapeutic intervention.

Keywords

Temporality Phenomenological psychopathology Dimensional psychopathology 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychiatric DepartmentUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Human NeurosciencesSapienza University of RomeRomeItaly

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