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Shakespeare in Mzansi

  • Adele Seeff
Chapter
Part of the Global Shakespeares book series (GSH)

Abstract

Seeff’s final case study is Shakespeare in Mzansi, a made-for-television miniseries, commissioned by the government-funded South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) in 2006. These adaptations of Shakespeare’s texts, using black actors, several of the nine official vernacular languages, and local settings, facilitate an Africanization of the early modern texts for ideological purposes. A multilingual ethos pervades this series, as individual programs—two of Macbeth, one of King Lear, and one of Romeo and Juliet—seamlessly employ several vernacular languages within a single appropriation, code-switching among them to produce identity through language. These programs, for their moment, appropriate the plays to redress linguistic persecution and to reclaim diversity.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.RockvilleUSA

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