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André Brink’s Kinkels innie Kabel: Political Vision and Linguistic Virtuosity

  • Adele Seeff
Chapter
Part of the Global Shakespeares book series (GSH)

Abstract

In the first of three case studies, Seeff analyzes André Brink’s linguistic tour de force, Kinkels innie Kabel (1970), a burlesque transposition into Kaaps of Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors. Seeff argues that Brink offers a radical critique of apartheid’s obsession with linguistic and ethnic purity. Kaaps, a hybridized mix of English and Afrikaans, used by the “Cape Coloured” population, marked class and political disenfranchisement. Brink’s production, very much under the shadow of apartheid’s restrictive legislation, focuses on the creolized “Cape Coloured” population and their local Kaaps carnival setting, and proposes a mestizo citizenship/identity for all South Africans. Seeff concludes that Shakespeare’s farce accommodates the translator’s Kaaps to forge a new South African identity.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.RockvilleUSA

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