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Spine and Pelvic Pathology Presenting with Posterior Hip Pain

  • Joshua S. Bowler
  • David Vier
  • Frank Feigenbaum
  • Manu Gupta
  • Andrew E. Park
Chapter

Abstract

Many pathologic conditions of the spine and pelvis have posterior gluteal or “hip” pain as a presenting symptom. It is critical that a thorough history is taken as well as a detailed physical examination of the patient. From this information, pertinent imaging studies may be ordered to better direct the physician toward an accurate diagnosis for the patient’s symptoms. Because pain in this region can be from many different pathologic processes, it is very important that the evaluating physician considers and evaluates the patient in a systematic fashion to properly work up the patient.

Keywords

Tarlov cyst Sacroiliac joint Lumbar disc herniation Spinal stenosis Buttock pain Synovial cyst Piriformis syndrome Meningeal cyst Vascular claudication 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua S. Bowler
    • 1
  • David Vier
    • 1
  • Frank Feigenbaum
    • 2
  • Manu Gupta
    • 3
  • Andrew E. Park
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic SurgeryDallasUSA
  2. 2.Feigenbaum NeurosurgeryDallasUSA
  3. 3.Division of NeuroradiologyBaylor University Medical Center—Dallas, Department of RadiologyDallasUSA
  4. 4.Orthopaedic SurgeryTexas A&M Health Science CenterDallasUSA
  5. 5.Baylor University Medical CenterDallasUSA
  6. 6.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryMethodist Hospital for SurgeryAddisonUSA

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