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The Salter Innominate Osteotomy

  • Claire E. Shannon
  • Simon P. Kelley
Chapter

Abstract

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), if left untreated in the young child, is known to result in early-onset hip dysfunction. Labral and chondral pathology manifests in the young adult and often results in an accelerated need for joint replacement due to the altered weight-bearing mechanics of the femoral head in a shallow acetabulum. Acetabular reorientation procedures, such as the Salter innominate osteotomy, are performed for DDH in the skeletally immature patient in order to acutely correct anterolateral acetabular deficiency by rotating the acetabular fragment about the symphysis pubis. The Salter innominate osteotomy therefore restores hip stability and may be used in combination with an open reduction and capsulorrhaphy, and/or with femoral osteotomies, as necessary. The improvement of the hip joint mechanics has also been found to induce remodeling of the acetabulum with continued growth of the child, leading to improved clinical outcomes.

Keywords

Developmental dysplasia of the hip DDH Acetabular dysplasia Pelvic osteotomy Acetabular reorientation Innominate osteotomy Salter Hip dislocation Acetabular index 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.The Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada

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