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The International Criminal Court: A Criminal World Court?

  • Sarah Babaian
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter and in accordance to the foregoing examination it will be determined how the subject-matter of the twin-pillar system lead to the response of the book, whether the ICC could be regarded as an International Criminal World Court which already at that stage has potentially worldwide jurisdiction upon every national of any State; may it be a Member or a Non-Member State to the Statute. The judicial pillar entails the analysis of significant provisions which deal with the “heart of the Statute”, the jurisdiction system of the Court, article 12 (2) (a) and 13 (b) Rome Statute. The huge controversies of these two articles are essential in response to the question and will therefore be portrayed extensively. Furthermore, attention will be paid on articles like 15 bis, 15 ter, 16, 17 and 124 to examine if these provisions may bar the Court to exercise its jurisdiction. Moreover, emphasis will be put on the enormously important article 27, which contains the irrelevance of the official capacity. Notwithstanding the analysis of the article itself, it will be also incidentally addressed and examined in relation to the jurisdiction mechanism regarding article 12 (2) (a), article 13 (b) as well as with respect to the cooperation and especially the matter of conflicting obligations, pursuant to article 98 (1). After verifying to what extent the judicial pillar underlines the question of the book affirmatively, an examination of the enforcement pillar will be evaluated. Whereas firstly the theoretical strength of the Court through the applicability of its provisions with regard to international cooperation and judicial assistance will be presented, extensive attention will be focused on the practical implementation of the Rome Statute’s provisions regarding cooperation and judicial assistance, thus States practice, to determine whether the cooperation system and therefore the whole enforcement mechanism of the Court operates effectively. In order to strengthen the cooperation regime of the ICC, possible new solutions will be examined. The conclusion will entail an extensive analysis of the statutory regime and its practical implementation in order to determine whether the ICC can be designated as an independent International Criminal World Court.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Babaian
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany

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