Advertisement

A Long Journey: Disability and Inclusive Education in International Law

  • Ilektra SpandagouEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the development of understandings of inclusive education in international policy. It begins with an overview of how disability and the education of students with disability have been addressed in UN Conventions and related documents. This is followed by a discussion of the Article 24: Education of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which provides the normative content for States Parties to implement inclusive education. The third part of the chapter illustrates the complexities around the implementation of inclusive education with examples from Initial Reports submitted as part of the Convention’s reporting process. In the concluding section, the recent General Comment 4 is presented to demonstrate the practice implications for educational systems and schools.

Keywords

International law Human rights Disability Inclusive education Policy 

References

  1. Armstrong, A. C., Armstrong, D., & Spandagou, I. (2010). Inclusive education: International policy & practice. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. Armstrong, D., Armstrong, A. C., & Spandagou, I. (2011). Inclusion: By choice or by chance. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 15(1), 29–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Arnardottir, O. M. (2009). A future of multidimensional disadvantage equality? In O. M. Arnardottir & G. Quinn (Eds.), The UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities: European and Scandinavian perspectives (pp. 41–66). Lieden: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Degener, T. (2016). Disability in a human rights context. Laws, 5(35), 1–24.  https://doi.org/10.3390/Lwas5030035.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Degener, T. (2017). A new human rights model of disability. In V. Della Fina, R. Cera, & G. Palmisano (Eds.), The United Nations convention on the rights of persons with disabilities; a commentary (pp. 41–59). Cham: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Degener, T., & Begg, A. (2017). From invisible citizens to agents of change: A short history of the struggle for the recognition of the rights of persons with disabilities at the United Nations. In V. Della Fina, R. Cera, & G. Palmisano (Eds.), The United Nations convention on the rights of persons with disabilities; a commentary (pp. 1–39). Cham: Springer.Google Scholar
  7. Della Fina, V. (2017). Article 24 [Education]. In V. Della Fina, R. Cera, & G. Palmisano (Eds.), The United Nations convention on the rights of persons with disabilities; a commentary (pp. 439–470). Cham: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fredman, S. (2005). Disability equality; a challenge to the existing anti-discrimination paradigm? In A. Lawson & C. Gooding (Eds.), Disability rights in Europe: From theory to practice (pp. 199–218). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Kanter, A. S. (2015). The development of disability rights under international law. Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  10. Kayess, R., & French, P. (2008). Out of darkness into light? Introducing the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. Human Rights Law Review, 1(8), 1–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Meekosha, H., & Soldatic, K. (2011). Human rights and the global South: The case of disability. Third World Quarterly, 32(8), 1383–1397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Miles, S., & Singal, N. (2010). The education for all and inclusive education debate: Conflict, contradiction or opportunity? International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(1), 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Oliver, M. (1996). Understanding disability: From theory to practice. London: Macmillan Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Rieser, R. (2012). Inclusive education: A human right. In M. Cole (Ed.), Education, equality and human rights; issues of gender, ‘race’, sexuality, disability and social class (3rd ed., pp. 190–216). Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  15. Rioux, M. H., & Riddle, C. A. (2011). Values in disability policy and law: Equality. In M. H. Rioux, L. A. Basser, & M. Jones (Eds.), Critical perspectives on human rights and disability law (pp. 37–55). Lieden: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. United Nations. (2013). Report of the office of the United Nations high commissioner for human rights: Thematic study on the right of persons with disabilities. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  17. United Nations. (2016). General comment no. 4 (2016) on the right to inclusive education. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  18. United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. (2014a). Concluding observations on the initial report of Belgium. Geneva: United Nations.Google Scholar
  19. United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. (2014b). Concluding observations on the initial report of Ecuador. Geneva: United Nations.Google Scholar
  20. Winzer, M., & Mazurek, K. (2014). The convention on the rights of persons with disabilities: Notes on genealogy and prospects. International Journal of Special Needs Education, 17(1), 3–12.  https://doi.org/10.9782/2159-4341-17.1.3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. World Health Organization. (1980). International classification of impairment, disability and handicap (ICIDH). Geneva: World Health Organization.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sydney School of Education and Social WorkThe University of SydneyCamperdownAustralia

Personalised recommendations