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The Need for an Understanding of Education Law Principles by School Principals

  • Mark ButlinEmail author
  • Karen Trimmer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is aimed at setting the scene for the whole book. We commence by exploring an evidence based view that all school principals need some understanding of legal principles as they pertain to the educational setting. The arguments suggest that having a basic understanding of legal matters, should enable principals to be better equipped to recognise and more appropriately respond to a legal problem. We then explore developing trends of this topic over the past two to three decades by examining what legal matters have intersected with school authorities. A consideration of what level of legal understanding principals do possess is then mentioned. Data drawn from a recent research study undertaken on this issue followed by considerations and implications that stem from not having a basic level of literacy are also revealed.

Keywords

Education law Negligence Leadership Legal literacy Fear of legal action/consequences Rights of the Child 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia

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