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Infections in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

  • Shahid Husain
  • Coleman Rotstein
Chapter

Abstract

Solid organ transplant recipients are rendered susceptible to infections arising endogenously as well as exogenously from the environment or the donated organ by virtue of the immunosuppressive therapy used to control rejection of the transplanted organ. These infections may be produced by a variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. However, the typical signs and symptoms of these infections may be masked or absent in transplant recipients due to the effect of immunosuppressive agents. Antimicrobial prophylaxis may effectively reduce the impact and incidence of these infections.

Keywords

Infections Solid organ Transplantation prophylaxis 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of MedicineUniversity of Toronto, and Multi-organ Transplant Program, University Health NetworkTorontoCanada

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