Population and Socio-economic Prospects

Chapter

Abstract

People are born and reared in a social group context—the family. This is not unique among living organisms. However, the initial longer growth-phase of humans (childhood and adolescence) makes human survival dependent on social support for a longer fraction of their life cycle.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Marketing and ManagementMacquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of California RiversideRiversideUSA

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