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Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunctions in Later Life

  • Ana Hategan
  • James A. Bourgeois
  • Tracy Cheng
  • Julie Young
Chapter

Abstract

Sexual needs appear to be similar in adult life and late life, with variations in mode of expression, frequency, and intensity. However, for older adults, there are a number of factors that can create barriers to achieving sexual expression. Older adults experience multiple age-related physiological changes in sexual functioning. During the aging process, it can be common for both males and females to experience sexual dysfunction relating to any issue that arises during the four stages of the sexual response cycle (excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution). Inappropriate sexual behaviors in institutionalized settings are more likely to occur in patients with major neurocognitive disorders. Clinicians working with older adults need to remain knowledgeable of legal and ethical issues related to the right to consensual sexual activity, which are discussed in this section. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of sexual dysfunction in older adults are also reviewed.

Keywords

Sexuality Sexual dysfunction Geriatric sexuality Late-life sexual expression Sexual disinhibition 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Hategan
    • 1
  • James A. Bourgeois
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tracy Cheng
    • 4
  • Julie Young
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural NeurosciencesMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryBaylor Scott and White Health Central Texas DivisionDallasUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryTexas A&M University Health Science Center, College of MedicineTempleCanada
  4. 4.St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, McMaster UniversityHamiltonUSA
  5. 5.Mercy San Juan Medical CenterFarmingtonUSA

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