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Lean Manufacturing Tools

  • José Luís Quesado Pinto
  • João Carlos O. Matias
  • Carina Pimentel
  • Susana Garrido Azevedo
  • Kannan Govindan
Chapter
Part of the Management for Professionals book series (MANAGPROF)

Abstract

This chapter is focused on the more visible part of JIT, providing a detailed description of a set of basic lean manufacturing tools for a successful JIT implementation. The Lean tools explored in this chapter are: 5S, Standardized Work, SMED—Single Minute Exchange of Die, and Kanban System. The chapter is enriched with a case study used to explain the application of the Lean manufacturing tools in practice. Many examples of practical applications and some worksheets are incorporated to help managers in the implementation issues. In general, for each tool a detailed description of the tool and of its elements is presented. Next, the requirements for its implementation are elaborated. Afterwards, the implementation issues are explained, followed by a demonstration of the practical application of the tool in a case study company and an exposition of the results achieved.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Luís Quesado Pinto
    • 1
  • João Carlos O. Matias
    • 2
  • Carina Pimentel
    • 2
  • Susana Garrido Azevedo
    • 3
  • Kannan Govindan
    • 4
  1. 1.LATAM AirlinesSao PauloBrazil
  2. 2.DEGEITUniversity of AveiroAveiroPortugal
  3. 3.Department of Business and EconomicsUniversity of Beira InteriorCovilhaPortugal
  4. 4.Department of Technology and InnovationUniversity of Southern DenmarkOdense MDenmark

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