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Theories and Conceptions of Giftedness

  • Robert J. Sternberg
  • Scott Barry Kaufman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses theories and conceptions of giftedness. First, it presents some of the history of these theories and conceptions—from domain-general to domain-specific to systems to developmental models. Then it reviews programs based on various conceptions of giftedness, including the theory of successful intelligence, the third-ring conception, Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY), and German models. Then it discusses the future of the field and finally it draws conclusions.

Keywords

Giftedness Intelligence Creativity Wisdom Experience 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human Development, B44 MVRCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Positive Psychology CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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