Advertisement

Gothic Romance and Retribution in the Short Fiction of Isabella Valancy Crawford

  • Melissa Edmundson
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Gothic book series (PAGO)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the short fiction of Isabella Valancy Crawford, and how Crawford used the Gothic romance genre to craft fictional heroines who gain more autonomy and greater freedom than their late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century literary forbears. The chapter examines two early stories by Crawford, “The Perfect Number Seven” (1880) and “Sèvres Fulkes” (1885), as well as two of her final stories which are set in distinctly Canadian settings, “Extradited” (1886) and “In the Breast of a Maple” (c. 1887). These stories show that not only did Crawford manage to succeed in the competitive world of popular magazines, becoming one of the first Canadian women writers to make her career as an author, but she also was integral to the creation of a more progressive imagining of the Gothic heroine.

Bibliography

  1. Birkhead, Edith (1963 [1921]), The Tale of Terror: A Study of the Gothic Romance, New York: Russell & Russell.Google Scholar
  2. Burpee, Lawrence J. (1909), A Little Book of Canadian Essays, Toronto: Musson.Google Scholar
  3. Clouston, Thomas Smith (1883), Clinical Lectures on Mental Diseases, London: J. & A. Churchill.Google Scholar
  4. Crawford, Isabella Valancy (2009a [1880]), “The Perfect Number Seven,” in Len Early and Michael Peterman (eds.), Collected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, London, ON: Canadian Poetry Press, pp. 292–310.Google Scholar
  5. ——— (2009b [1885]), “Sèvres Fulkes,” in Len Early and Michael Peterman (eds.), Collected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, London, ON: Canadian Poetry Press, pp. 443–449.Google Scholar
  6. ——— (2009c [1886]), “Extradited,” in Len Early and Michael Peterman (eds.), Collected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, London, ON: Canadian Poetry Press, pp. 450–458.Google Scholar
  7. ——— (2009d [1887]), “In the Breast of a Maple,” in Len Early and Michael Peterman (eds.), Collected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, London, ON: Canadian Poetry Press, pp. 480–485.Google Scholar
  8. Dellamora, Richard (2002), “Isabella Valancy Crawford and an English Canadian Sodom,” Canadian Literature 173 (Summer): 16–32.Google Scholar
  9. Duncan, Sara Jeannette (1886), “Saunterings,” The Week 28 (October): 771–772.Google Scholar
  10. Early, Len (2011), “Border Crossings in Isabella Valancy Crawford’s Story-Paper Fiction,” Canadian Literature 209 (Summer): 109–125.Google Scholar
  11. Early, Len, and Michael Peterman (2009), “Introduction: Isabella Valancy Crawford and the Nineteenth-Century Short Story,” in Len Early and Michael Peterman (eds.), Collected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, London, ON: Canadian Poetry Press, pp. xi–xlv.Google Scholar
  12. Farmiloe, Dorothy (1983), Isabella Valancy Crawford: The Life and Legends, Ottawa, Canada: The Tecumseh Press.Google Scholar
  13. Gadpaille, Michelle (1988), The Canadian Short Story, Toronto: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Galvin, Elizabeth McNeill (1994), Isabella Valancy Crawford: We Scarcely Knew Her, Toronto, ON, Canada: Natural Heritage/Natural History.Google Scholar
  15. Hathaway, E. J. (1895), “Isabella Valancy Crawford,” The Canadian Magazine 5 (October): 569–572.Google Scholar
  16. Hay, Simon (2011), A History of the Modern British Ghost Story, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  17. Heilman, Robert B. (1958), “Charlotte Brontë’s ‘New’ Gothic,” in Robert C. Rathburn and Martin Steinmann, Jr. (eds.), From Jane Austen to Joseph Conrad: Essays Collected in Memory of James T. Hillhouse, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 118–132.Google Scholar
  18. Langbauer, Laurie (1990), Women and Romance: The Consolations of Gender in the English Novel, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Leland, Charles G. (1884), The Algonquin Legends of New England, Or, Myths and Folk Lore of the Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot Tribes, Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  20. Letter from Editor of Pictorial Times to Isabella Valancy Crawford. Isabella Valancy Crawford Papers, Lorne Piece Collection, Douglas Library, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.Google Scholar
  21. Linton, Eliza Lynn (1868), “The Girl of the Period,” Saturday Review 25 (14 March): 339–340.Google Scholar
  22. Lynch, Gerald, and Angela Arnold Robbeson (1999), “Introduction,” in Gerald Lynch and Angela Arnold Robbeson (eds.), Dominant Impressions: Essays on the Canadian Short Story, Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, pp. 1–8.Google Scholar
  23. MacLeod, Alexander (2015), “The Canadian Short Story in English: Aesthetic Agency, Social Change, and the Shifting Canon,” in Cynthia Sugars (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Canadian Literature, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 426–447.Google Scholar
  24. Martin, Mary F. (1972), “The Short Life of Isabella Valancy Crawford,” Dalhousie Review 52 (Autumn): 390–400.Google Scholar
  25. Massé, Michelle A. (1992), In the Name of Love: Women, Masochism, and the Gothic, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  26. McMullen, Lorraine, and Sandra Campbell (1993), “Introduction,” in Lorraine McMullen and Sandra Campbell (eds.), Aspiring Women: Short Stories by Canadian Women, Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, pp. 1–11.Google Scholar
  27. “Mental Delusions” (1891), The World of Wonders: A Record of Things Wonderful in Nature, Science, and Art, London: Cassell.Google Scholar
  28. Moers, Ellen (1976), Literary Women, Garden City, NY: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  29. Moodie, Susanna (1989 [1853]), Life in the Clearings Versus the Bush, Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.Google Scholar
  30. Nischik, Reingard M. (2007), “The Canadian Short Story: Status, Criticism, Historical Survey,” in Reingard M. Nischik (ed.), The Canadian Short Story: Interpretations, Rochester, NY: Camden House, pp. 1–39.Google Scholar
  31. O’Hagan, Thomas (1896), “Some Canadian Women Writers,” Catholic World 63 (September): 779–795.Google Scholar
  32. Peterman, Michael (2005), “Writing for the Illustrated Story Papers in the 1870s: Individuality and Conformity in Isabella Valancy Crawford’s Stories and Serialized Fiction,” Short Story 13.1: 73–87.Google Scholar
  33. Petrone, Penny (1975), “Introduction,” in Penny Petrone (ed.), Selected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford, Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, pp. 9–16.Google Scholar
  34. ——— (1977), The Imaginative Achievement of Isabella Valancy Crawford, Diss., University of Alberta.Google Scholar
  35. Reiss, Timothy J. (2003), Mirages of the Selfe: Patterns of Personhood in Ancient and Early Modern Europe, Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky (1986), The Coherence of Gothic Conventions, New York and London: Methuen.Google Scholar
  37. Sutherland, Katherine (2008), “Re-evaluating the Literary Reputation of Isabella Valancy Crawford,” in Jennifer Chambers (ed.), Diversity and Change in Early Canadian Women’s Writing, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 120–138.Google Scholar
  38. Thomas, Clara (1979), “Crawford’s Achievement,” in Frank M. Tierney (ed.), The Isabella Valancy Crawford Symposium, Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, pp. 131–136.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa Edmundson
    • 1
  1. 1.Clemson UniversityClemsonUSA

Personalised recommendations