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An Overview of Response Spectrum Superposition Methods for MDOF Structures

  • I. D. Gupta
Chapter

Abstract

This paper reviews the response spectrum superposition methods to estimate the maximum amplitudes of various response quantities at different levels of multi-degree-of-freedom structures for earthquake-resistant design applications in a very convenient way. The available methods are based on varying degrees of assumptions and idealizations, leading to widely varying errors in the results. The recent methods considering modal interaction effects more accurately and also considering the contribution of high-frequency rigid modes by quasi-static response need to specify additional parameters like exact spectrum velocity amplitudes and the peak ground acceleration, which are generally not available readily. The various approximations and need of specifying additional parameters are eliminated in the stochastic method described in the paper. A large number of numerical results are computed to analyze the relative performance of the commonly used response spectrum superposition methods.

Keywords

Response spectrum superposition MDOF structures Normal mode theory Maximum response 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Water and Power Research Station (Formerly)PuneIndia

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