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Japanese Politics Between 2014 and 2017: The Search for an Opposition Party in the Age of Abe

  • Robert J. Pekkanen
  • Steven R. Reed
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter traces out the major political events between the December 2014 and October 2017 general elections in Japan. The chapter covers the reduction in size of the House of Representatives (from 475 to 465 seats), the lowering of the voting age from 20 to 18, the results of the 2016 House of Councillors election won by Prime Minister Shinzō Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party, the 2016 Tokyo Gubernatorial Election won by Yuriko Koike, the creation of the Party of Hope and the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, and the decline of the Democratic Party (previously the Democratic Party of Japan).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Pekkanen
    • 1
  • Steven R. Reed
    • 2
  1. 1.Jackson School of International StudiesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of Policy StudiesChuo UniversityHachiojiJapan

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