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Persistence of Women’s Under-Representation

  • Mari Miura
Chapter

Abstract

Forty-seven women were elected in the general election of 2017, increasing the ratio of women in the House of Representatives (HR) to 10.1% from 9.1%. As a result, according to the Inter-parliamentary Union (IPU), Japan’s international ranking in Women in National Parliaments moved only slightly upward, from 164th (as of September 2017) to 157th (as of December 2017). Why does women’s under-representation persist in Japan? This chapter summarizes the structural factors that answer this question. It then investigates the characteristics of women candidates and winners, probing the degree to which women parliamentarians represent women in civil society. Lastly, it sheds light on the prospect of a quota law, or more precisely, the gender parity law, which was submitted to the Diet but not voted on in 2017.

Keywords

Elected women Quotas Gender parity Elite survey Descriptive representation Substantive representation 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mari Miura
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawSophia UniversityChiyoda-kuJapan

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