Introduction

  • Dario Narducci
  • Peter Bermel
  • Bruno Lorenzi
  • Ning Wang
  • Kazuaki Yazawa
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Materials Science book series (SSMATERIALS, volume 268)

Abstract

The main topics covered in this book will be introduced. An overview of the historical trend of energy consumption over the last one hundred years will show the crucial need for renewable sources progressively replacing fossil and nuclear power supply. Among renewables, solar harvesting is surely the most promising technology, already playing a significant role in the global power landscape. Demand for higher efficiencies and lower power costs may open yet partially unexplored paths where PV modules are paired to ancillary harvesters to improve the usability of solar power, which will be the main focus of this book.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dario Narducci
    • 1
  • Peter Bermel
    • 2
  • Bruno Lorenzi
    • 3
  • Ning Wang
    • 4
  • Kazuaki Yazawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Materials ScienceUniversity of Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly
  2. 2.Birck Nanotechnology CenterPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  3. 3.University of Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly
  4. 4.Chinese Academy of SciencesInstitute of Soil and Water ConservationYanglingChina

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