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Introduction

  • Ainhoa Montoya
Chapter
Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Abstract

The book’s introduction lays out the ways in which the relationship between violence and democracy, which has been assumed to be antithetical in the context of post-Cold War peacebuilding operations, can be problematized from an anthropological perspective. This introductory chapter also delves into the epistemological value of rumors as both a relevant object of enquiry and an analytical lens through which to learn about a violent democracy like El Salvador’s. It provides background on El Salvador’s war and ensuing peacebuilding operation as well as the country’s twentieth-century processes of statecraft and citizenship so as to elucidate why El Salvador serves as a pertinent case study for an enquiry into the relationship between violence and democracy.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ainhoa Montoya
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Latin American StudiesUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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