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Introduction

  • Maximilian Jaede
Chapter
Part of the International Political Theory book series (IPoT)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the traditional view of Hobbes as a predecessor of realist theories of international relations, and considers revisionist interpretations that associate him with liberal internationalism. The chapter sets out how a focus on Hobbes’s conception of peace opens up a more nuanced perspective on his international political thought. In particular, the discussion highlights the international dimension of civil conflict, and possible connections between internal and external pacification.

Keywords

Hobbes Realism Liberal internationalism Negative peace Positive peace 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Open LearningUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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