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Introduction

  • Jean Boase-BeierEmail author
  • Lina Fisher
  • Hiroko Furukawa
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

One of the most important research tools for investigating the interaction of theory and practice in Literary Translation, which Boase-Beier, Fisher and Furukawa understand as a sub-discipline of Translation Studies, is the case study. Because a case study involves an in-depth description and explanation of a specific area, issue or phenomenon, it allows particular insights about the nature of Literary Translation to be formulated and reflected upon.

For this book, the editors have gathered together translation case studies focussing on style, identity, or the relationships between authors, translators and readers. The studies, each of which represents a particular area of expertise, have been undertaken by researchers working in many different languages, cultures and literary genres, most of whom are also practising translators.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Boase-Beier
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lina Fisher
    • 2
  • Hiroko Furukawa
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Literature, Drama and Creative WritingUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  2. 2.Independent ScholarNorwichUK
  3. 3.Department of EnglishTohoku Gakuin UniversitySendaiJapan

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