Advertisement

Understanding the Challenges of Academic Presentations for EAP Students: An Exploratory Practice Approach

  • Simon Mumford
Chapter

Abstract

This piece of Exploratory Practice was based on my initial puzzle of how L2 English for Academic Purposes (EAP) students perceived the difficulties involved in assessed academic presentations. The data consists of a transcription of a class discussion of the issue, extracts of which are used to illustrate student attitudes and insights, as well as students’ written comments. Reflection on the data led me to new perspectives. As a language teacher, I had tended to focus on language issues and the structure of presentations; however, rather than language, students highlighted the difficulties caused by presentation stress, and described how this related to factors such as interest in the topic, appropriate body language, and the effort invested in preparation and practice. Students underlined the importance of topic choice as a key area influencing overall motivation, and therefore performance.

Keywords

Exploratory Practice Student academic presentations English for academic purposes Student perceptions of difficulty Student motivation 

References

  1. Akyazı, K. (2015). Exploring authenticity in (outside) and EFL classroom using Tedtalks and youtube. In K. Dikilitaş, M. Wyatt, J. Hanks, & D. Bullock (Eds.), Teachers engaging in research (pp. 191–206). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  2. Allwright, D. (2003). Exploratory practice: Rethinking practitioner research in language teaching. Language Teaching Research, 72, 113–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Allwright, D. (2015). Putting ‘understanding’ first in practitioner research. In K. Dikilitaş, R. Smith, & W. Trotman (Eds.), Teacher researchers in action (pp. 19–36). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  4. Dar, Y. (2015). Exploratory practice: Investigating my own classroom pedagogy. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 51–56). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  5. Hanks, J. (2015). Language teachers making sense of exploratory practice. Language Teaching Research, 19(5), 612–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hanks, J. (2016). What might research as practice look like? In K. Dikilitaş, M. Wyatt, J. Hanks, & D. Bullock (Eds.), Teachers engaging in research (pp. 19–30). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  7. Hill, M., & Storey, A. (2003). Speakeasy: Online support for oral presentation skills. English Language Teaching Journal, 57(4), 370–376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mason, E., & Nazim, A. (2014). Preparing students for an academic presentation: Maximising class time. In A. Burns (Ed.), Cambridge English Research Notes 56 (pp. 16–21). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Miller, I. K., Cortes, T. C. R., de Oliveira, A. F. A., & Braga, W. (2015). Exploratory practice in initial teacher education: Working collaboratively for understanding. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 65–72). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  10. Moran, K. (2015). Exploratory/action research to improve oral presentations with French engineering students. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 57–64). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar
  11. Nazim, A. (2015). Preparing students for an academic presentation: Maximising class time. In D. Bullock & R. Smith (Eds.), Teachers research! (pp. 45–50). Faversham, UK: IATEFL.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Mumford
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Foreign Languages, Izmir University of EconomicsİzmirTurkey

Personalised recommendations